If Seeing Was Believing

When Jesus of Nazareth supposedly revealed himself as the ‘Christ messiah’ to Constantine at Milvian Bridge, near Rome, in the year later recorded as 311 AD He explained to the Roman Emperor the purpose of the vision Constantine claimed to have seen years earlier.  

In this dream the revealed messiah Christ used Greek words: In most representations, though they are rarely to be found, of this pivotal development which preceded imperial Rome’s transformation into ‘the Holy Roman Empire’ Rome’s Latin language, ‘Hoc Signo Victor Eros’, is employed to convey Constantine’s supposed instruction that he, and Rome, would be victorious by using the sign of the cross.

And so before his pivotal battle at Milvian Bridge Constantine instructed his forces to adorn their shields and/or armour with the symbol of a, vertical, cross.

Symbolically the image of the cross has huge significance to the Roman and Anglican Catholic churches and Jesus of Nazareth, proclaimed the Christ messiah by Rome at a council of/in Nicea just over 1600 years ago and more than 400 years after the presumed date that Jesus of Nazareth died in, is often represented with his arms outstretched in the shape of the cross.

This image is purposefully recreated by the statue of Christ The Redeemer above Brasilia, in Brazil.

Romans had long believed that Rome , the eternal city, was the place where the pantheon of Gods they worshipped, communicated with mere mortals.

The religious representative of Rome, whom the Gods were believed to communicate was called the Pontifica Maxi. The Bishop of Rome, referred to as The Pope, is also called The Pontiff.

The first (Christian) religious leader to be called ‘Pope’ hailed from the Coptic Church in Alexandria, Egypt.

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